Autistic burnout

#AutismAcceptanceWeek

Autistic burnout:

Before my autism diagnosis, I didn’t understand why I kept getting depressed.

I did notice a link between juggling conflicting priorities e.g. a pressurised project at work at the same time as problems at home (e.g. my eldest was a frequently unwell baby), or two big work projects at the same time.

Every time it was diagnosed as depression and treated like depression: a month off work, SSRIs, counselling, talking therapies and I did a lot of soul searching, theorising (e.g. is it because my first long-term boyfriend eroded my self-esteem, or because I was bullied at school, or because of traumas like my two missed miscarriages), and self-care like long country walks.

Every time I’d bounce back strong, positive, and highly productive. Hyper-productive, even.

After fourteen years of this, I asked my doctor for a referral for bipolar disorder. I felt “crazy”.

Eventually, I was told this couldn’t be bipolar, because that is apparently cyclical, and what I was experiencing had a specific trigger… being stressed beyond my ability to cope, and crashing.

Only after my autism diagnosis, which only happened because it was picked up as the underlying cause of my son’s anxiety when he was fourteen, did I realise this was autistic burnout.

Only then was I was able to identify the triggers, and start self-advocating to avoid it happening again… Successfully!

What a shame the medical profession didn’t pick up on my autism sooner! All the signs were there, even the family history (my brother). I could have been helped so much earlier!

Author: Charlie Hart

Late-diagnosed autistic working mum, attempting to write an amusing semi-autobiographical novel with a twist.

One thought on “Autistic burnout”

  1. The waiting for a societal change, ..for a surge in diagnostic understanding in the medical profession is so painful. I feel that as late diagnosed women, we can all see each other, hiding in plain sight, but that we still have to wait so long, too long for change. All we can do is keep speaking up, keep educating society from the inside out. Thank you for the value you speak on the matter. It’s welcome, clear and so very important.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: